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Tipp City Horse Trails
were developed in
cooperation and with
volunteer assistance by:


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MCEITF
  by Judy York, Director of Horses & Humans Helping Each Other

Equine Therapy offers benefit to a wide range of physical issues. For example, individuals who have spasticity (an involuntarily muscle reaction), riding a horse in a therapeutic situation has shown to reduce the affliction. Many individuals along the Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience significant improvements in sensory integration as a result of the dynamic movement.

Equine Therapy and its benefits have been recognized for many years. It is a proven method of increasing the physical, mental, emotional and developmental capabilities for individuals with disabilities, functional limitation or medical issues. There is a healing interaction between horses, riders and the people who help them.

Riding encourages:

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Cognitive Activity
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Independence & Social Skills
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Sensory Integration
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Emotional Stability
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Correct Muscle Tone
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Self Esteem
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Gross & Fine Motor Skills
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Vocalization
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Increased Physical Stamina
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Smiles
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Proper Posture    
 
   
Equine Therapy can produce dramatic and lasting benefits. Depending upon a client’s individual challenges, strengths and goals, equine therapy addresses special needs through a combination of factors:

The motion of the horse and client’s efforts to maintain a balanced seat help to strengthen the trunk and spine. Because a horse’s walking stride is similar in length and cadence to a human’s stride, the pelvic movement mimics the action of walking and provides vital exercise for riders who cannot walk independently.

The content of the session challenges clients cognitively as well as physically. Our long-term goal for our clients is to have them become independent to their greatest ability.

The client’s team of volunteers provide moment-to-moment support, keep the client safe in the saddle and focused on the lesson. Trust and positive social interactions flow from the client’s relationships with leader and sidewalkers.

The relationship between horse and client is typically one of deep trust and affection, strengthened by touch as the client learns to groom and care for the horse. Clients often end the lesson by hugging and kissing their horses”.


Sources:
http://www.forwardstride.org/benefits.html